Wednesday, December 06, 2017

Sointu

I think I bought the Sointu pattern as soon as it came out, such a simple but elegant pattern.  I knew I didn't want to make it in knit fabric, but wasn't sure how it would turn out in woven to I used some very, very cheap polyester I bought from Textile Traders that I think was $2 a metre on the bargain table. I can't believe I'm saying this about a polyester top, but I love it. I've already worn it out twice in the last two weeks.
I measured between two sizes and after measuring the pattern I chose the size down. I'm glad I did, it's a perfect fit. The only thing I altered was the neckline, I folded it over twice and hand stitched it down, not the neatest job, but is a lot neater than if I tried to face this fabric.
The perfect top to wear out with jeans - there will be at least one more!

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Staircase to the Moon

And now for something completely different - a minimalist quilt.
Inspired by the Staircase to the Moon which happens as the full moon rises over the tidal flats in Broome. It is so beautiful and amazing to watch.
I pieced a full circle into a rectangle of fabric (I used the Creative Grids Circle Savvy Ruler to do this) and then added rectangles for the stairs.
Every time I decide to pebble quilt I have a moment of regret as I start, it is very time consuming, but it is worth it to get the amazing texture. 
The finished quilt is 28" x 38" and will be added to the mini quilt wall in our passage.


Friday, October 20, 2017

Geometric

Grey, grey and yellow, the perfect colour combination. I made half triangle, quarter triangle, half rectangle and drunkards path blocks. A random number of each. Then I mixed them with some plain squares and rearranged them until I was happy with the arrangement.
I divided the quilt into sections and quilted lines 1/4" apart. I have no idea how people have the patience to quilt 1/8" apart, 1/4" is all I can manage. 
 I love it when I find the perfect backing in my stash.
The perfect mix of planning and seeing what happens as I go along. A pleasure to make from the start until the end. The perfect way to sew.

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Sails of Silver

 I grew up listening to Steeleye Span, my parents loved them and so did my sisters and I. While listening to music one day I knew the chorus from Sails of Silver would make a great wallhanging.
I started with a vague plan, I knew I wanted to paper piece the letters and it needed a boat. I used the Refridgerator Magnets by Elizabeth Hartman. It is not a paper piecing pattern (it uses a different method), but if you have had some experience you can work out how to use them. 

 I'm no expert, there was much ripping out and swearing, but I eventually made all the letters.
 Next I googled images of sail boats and then drew up a generic one in Electric Quilt. It is not obvious in the photo, but the sails are made from a silver fabric I found in Bunbury at Craft Collections. I think it is this one from Kaufman. 
 For a bit of contrast with all the paper piecing and to add some extra colour I improv pieced some waves using different blues and more of the silver.
 To put it all together I placed it all on the design board and starting with the letters I joined one line and then the next, I just worked on adding one more section at a time and gradually it all came together.
I really enjoyed the process of making this quilt. I don't often go into making a quilt without having the whole thing mapped out, but it was quite enjoyable seeing where it went. Now to think about how to quilt it.

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Butterfly and Cocoon

Olive was browsing ravelry one day with me and saw this butterfly and cocoon. I think it was love at first sight as she has been asking me to make her one ever since. She is turning 5 next week and it's all wrapped up waiting for her.
 Ok now to my quick review of the pattern. I'm not a big fan of dpns and small fiddly knitting, but this was actually enjoyable. It was fun to see it emerge and it was quite quick to knit. I think it is the finishing that actually puts me off knitting toys, but there wasn't much to do here and the little bit of finishing off was done as you go. It's hard to tell how big it is in the photos so I measured it and it's  about 8" tall (without measuring the antennae).

It is also super cute, in and out of it's cocoon. I'd definitely recommend this pattern - more details on ravelry. 
SaveSave

Monday, September 04, 2017

Flat Cap

Wool we bought in Kyoto last year, Liberty lining and the excellent Flat Cap pattern by Nicole Mallalieu
It was so much fun to make, and Chris was so happy with it, that I immediately made another one for my Dad. I can't recommend this pattern enough. 



Saturday, September 02, 2017

Naturally Dyed and Printed Dress

I really enjoyed the process of making this dress for Eva two years ago so I thought I would make one for Olive. It took a few months, but here it is!
This time I added another step to the process - I started with white fabric and dyed it with avocado pits (and used alum as a mordant). I saved avocado pits and froze them until I had enough to do the fabric and a few skeins of yarn. I cut up the pits and put them in my dyeing slow cooker. I put the yarn into a laundry bag, but just threw the fabric in (it wasn't hard to get the bits of avocado off after).  I left it cooking for a few hours and then turned it off and left it for a day or so and then rinsed it off and hung it out. 

It's quite a nice pinky colour - the exact colour of this hellebore.
I originally planned to print with silver, but it wasn't working so well so then I mixed up a dark pink with red, white and splash of black.
Olive chose a stamp I carved last month and I randomly printed all over the fabric. 
The pattern is one of my favourites - the Madeline Dress Pattern (I think I could make it blindfolded now I've made so many!).
It really is satisfying to transform a white piece of fabric into a dress. It is really nice not to rush something and to enjoy every step of the process.
SaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSave